Great Christmas Songs for Guitar

posted in: Guitar | 0

Here is a quick collection of links to Christmas songs you can play on guitar.

The classic hymns along with jingle bells: https://www.guitarworld.com/lessons/acoustic-nation-ten-easy-acoustic-guitar-holiday-songs

And 35 mostly pop Christmas songs for guitar: https://www.guitarhabits.com/top-35-easy-christmas-guitar-songs/

 

A possible easy / simplified / repeating chord progression for I’ll be home for Christmas :

 

G A7 D7

I’ll be home for Christmas

G E7 Am (alternative G A7 Em)
You can plan on me

C G D7 E7
Please have snow and mistletoe

A7 Am D7 or end A7 D7 G
And presents on the tree

Christmas Eve will find me
Where the lovelight gleams
I’ll be home for Christmas
If only in my dreams

I’ll be home for Christmas
You can plan on me
Please have snow and mistletoe
And presents on the tree

Christmas Eve will find me
Where the lovelight gleams
I’ll be home for Christmas
If only in my dreams

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How to play Money (That’s What I Want) by The Beatles / Barret Strong

posted in: Guitar | 0

An early Beatles cover, their original has so much energy for what is essential a fast 12 bar blues song.

It uses the chords: E7, A7, B7.

Why bother? Well some versions from The Beatles.

Starting back at the beginning, we have the high energy Hamburg version, probably the best:

Then their Decca audition from ’62,

 

 

The album version:

 

And a version from a TV show, which though blurred, shows how little they looked at their fingers/chord placements and how “little” they seem to be playing but to such effect.

 

But finally, I think its telling that when John Lennon played Toronto in 1969 with Eric Clapton and Klaus Voorman, weeks before The Beatles ended, of the limited set of songs they played, it included a slow version on Money.

 

 

For the intro and verse.

Alternatively the intro can be strummed, but to E7 or not to E7?

Intro

E / A / E / A / E / A / E / A / B7 / A7 / E / A / B7

E7 / A7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / A7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / E7 / A7 / B7

Verse

E / A / E / A7 / E / B7 / A7 / E / B7

but I think that over complicates things with a mix of A and A7, and E major so I prefer the E7, A7, B7 approach

E7 / A7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 / E7 / B7

 

And a final video that uses barre chords, and a different solo / intro tab, but does tie together the intro, verse/chorus and outro very well.

Outro is:

E7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 shorter intro.

E7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 / E7 /  E7

 

In rough summary:

 

Intro

Verse:

E7 / A7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 / E7 / B7

Outro / last 2 verses:

E7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 / E7 /  B7

E7 / E7 / A7 / E7 / B7 / A7 / E7 /  E7

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What colour combinations work best?

posted in: Design | 0

Little known fact, but Pantone choose a ‘Color for the Year‘ and for 2018 it is Ultra Violet. If you follow that link and scroll down you’ll also find the previous year’s colours.

What is great about this is they also suggest very useful colour combinations in their Tools for Designers, organised by mood. Allowing everyone to be ‘on trend’ this year.

Colours change with the seasons and also over the years to reflect fashion, global design influences and the idea of what feels ‘modern’ and ‘classic.

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How to setup internal page sizes to support bleed with KDP Print on Demand

Very technical question, but if on the pages of a book you want the image or the lines to extend to the end of the page (the trim) then you need to use something called bleed where you size the document larger than the trim size AND you images or lines extend past the trim size.

Short answer:

Format your PDF manuscript at 0.25” (6 mm) higher and 0.125” (3 mm) wider than your selected trim size in order to print the full bleed area.

There is some discussion about this topic here. One persons suggests it should also be 0.25” (6 mm), that is every edge (top, bottom, left, right) should extend by 0.125” (3 mm). E.g a 6×9 inch book for bleed needs a 6.25 x 9.25 inch file. But that seems to be counter to the official advice of:

If you want your images to bleed to the edges of your pages, extend them 0.125” (3 mm) beyond the normal trim size from the top, bottom, and outer edges for your manuscript, and on all edges for a cover. E.g. 6.125 x 9.25 inch file.

But it could be that having the extension of 0.125” (3 mm) on each edge to make 0.25” (6 mm) overall is just simply to control. E.g. a 6×9 inch book with bleed needs a file 6.25 x 9.25 inches.

And KDP’s Paperback Publishing guidelines are available here.

 

Also useful to note:

Line Width

If your book contains lines (i.e., a chart, table or graphic element), give the lines a minimum thickness/weight of 0.75 point or 0.01” (0.3 mm) to ensure they appear in print.

Grayscale Fill

If you‘ve selected black ink & white paper for a book containing gray backgrounds, we recommend a minimum grayscale ll of 10%.

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Introducing English to 8 year old children in school for the first time. A fun lesson plan about England and language.

These are talking points I used when I visited a class of 8 year olds in Finland who are just starting out with their first English lessons. The purpose is for them to ‘meet’ a real person from England and to get excited about learning English. That and some free candy should help them think English is a fun language to learn. Supporting objects: Union Jack flag, old school blazer, old school tie, bag of fudge/toffee (the most important thing).

 

There are lots of blank spacing lines in this article, so it can be revealed topic by topic on the classroom projector.

 

Hello

 

Up. Down

 

Yes. No

 

My name is …

(what is your name)

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s count numbers

How old are you?

I am …

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m English

I’m from London.

 

 

 

 

 

This is my flag

The British flag or Union Jack represents the countries of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The United Kingdom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colours

Say them often and say them LOUD.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children at school in England wear a uniform

Get 2 volunteers. One wears the blazer the other the tie.

Photo source: http://st-clementdanes.westminster.sch.uk

primary school blazer and tie uniform uk – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

These countries speak English. Anyone know the names of these countries?

english speaking countries flags – Google Image Search

(and many more countries, like Jamaica etc)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Distance from Laitila (Finland) to London

distance from Laitila to London – Google Search

Suomi is called Finland in English. 1 and half days driving!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s look at the weather here and in London

Laitila

London

 

 

 

 

 

London Transport

Red bus. Double decker bus.

 

 

 

 

 

London Underground train. The Tube.

London Transport – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Ben

Parliament is a very similar word in Finnish. Big Ben is the bell at the top of the clock.

Big Ben – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

What do English houses look like?

This is where my parents live.

 

 

 

 

 

English Breakfast

Bacon is a similar word in Finnish.

English Breakfast – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

Fish and Chips

Fish and Chips – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toffee?

Toffee – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fudge?

Fudge – Google Image Search

Toffee is pronounced/said differently in Finland. Toffee is soft in Finland, but is generally hard and sticky in England. What Finnish people call toffee we call fudge. (this shows a little bit differences and highlights “Finnish way” of saying some English words). The Finnish Omar sweets are quite similar to fudge.

Let’s try some. Let’s eat some.

 

Thank you

Thanks

Many thanks

Thank you very much

 

 

 

 

 

Days of the week

Say them often and say them LOUD.

Days of the week – Google Image Search

 

 

 

 

 

Months of the year

Say them often and say them LOUD.

Months of the year – Google Image Search

 

Any questions?

 

 

 

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What size paperbacks can you produce with KPD Print on Demand

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

The quick answer:

topic/G201834180

5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
5.06″ x 7.81″ (12.85 x 19.84 cm)
5.25″ x 8″ (13.34 x 20.32 cm)
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm) Typical large paperback size, so called most popular
6.14″ x 9.21″ (15.6 x 23.39 cm)
6.69″ x 9.61″ (16.99 x 24.4 cm)
7″ x 10″ (17.78 x 25.4 cm)
7.44″ x 9.69″ (18.9 x 24.61 cm)
7.5″ x 9.25″ (19.05 x 23.5 cm) My favourite larger size
8″ x 10″ (20.32 x 25.4 cm) Very commonly used by other book producers on Amazon for large items
8.5″ x 11″ (21.59 x 27.94 cm) Nearly A4 (A4 is 21.0 x 29.7cm, 8.27 x 11.69 inches)
8.25″ x 6″ (20.96 x 15.24 cm) Short spine and wide pages
8.25″ x 8.25″ (20.96 x 20.96 cm) My preferred square format.
8.5″ x 8.5″ (21.59 x 21.59 cm)

 

But, also possible:

If you want a different trim size, click “Select a different size” from the “Print Options” section and choose from Standard and Non-standard Trim sizes.

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Where can you get a list of HTML codes for using in KDP book descriptions?

The quick link to KDP is:

G201189630/

The ones I commonly use are:

<br> to create line break. I usually use 2 of them <br><br> to create a line break AND a blank line.

<strong></strong> for bolding text.

<i></i> for italic text.

<hr> creates a horizontal line across the page. I don’t currently use this but may in the future.

<ul> Creates a bulleted list from enclosed items, each of which is identified by a <li> tag. So that would be

<ul><li>my bullet</li></ul>

How to use these is explained reasonably well here:

How To Use HTML To Format KDP Kindle Book Descriptions

 

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Ways to Display Tweets on Your WordPress site

So the question is: ways to display Tweets on your WordPress site.

Ways to display Tweets on your WordPress site - Adrian Colin Doyle

Twitter itself provides you with a free and effective way of displaying your Tweets on your WordPress site. They just keep it a bit hidden from you.

  1. Click on you profile image (circle top right hand corner in your Twitter window)
  2. Click Settings and privacy
  3. On the left hand menu, cluck Widgets
  4. Click Create new button and choose Profile
  5. When prompted for ‘what would you like to embed’ give your Twitter handle, like @newbookcentral
  6. Choose Embedded Timeline for display options
  7. Instantly Twitter will produce a line of HTML code that you can copy and then paste to your WordPress webpage, using your normal page editor, but make sure you are editing in TEXT mode.

For WordPress plugins I’m still researching this, but for now the possibles are:

  • Rotating Tweets (Twitter widget and shortcake) – useful for putting a latest tweets rotating section at the foot of each blog post or article.
  • Feed Them Social – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine, Pinterest, etc by SlickRemix – my possible goto solution. But be aware that many of its features require the Premium version costing you approx $40.
  • Easy Twitter Feed Widget Plugin – WARNING seems to no longer work, included only because a lot of google search results seem to suggest the plugin, but they are out of date.

And to automatically post to Twitter from your WordPress:

  • WP to Twitter – I have yet to test this.

 

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